Think Pink: Popular Pink Flowers for Your Garden

Pink is a popular flower color, but some gardeners avoid it because it seems overused. Other gardeners who like more saturated colors such as blue, orange, or purple may worry pink will detract from richer hues or clash with them. Let’s look at the positive side of pink flowers and breathe fresh life into a color that many of us take for granted. Here are brief profiles of a few pink flower choices.

Types Of Pink Flowers

Rose Thrift

Also known as armeria, this flower needs full sun to part shade and thrives in rock gardens. They also work well if your garden has hot, dry spots with good drainage. The buds come in marble-sized balls and are often thought of as adorable and charming. Plant them en masse as a backdrop for larger flowers and erosion control.

Raspberry Wine Bee Balm

This brilliant hot pink flower attracts hummingbirds and butterflies, and its fragrance is one of the sweetest available. This bloom is particularly disease-resistant and is sometimes used in herbal tea. It needs full sun to avoid mildew problems; ask your nursery professional about plants to place nearby that help ward off this mold. This is a low-growing plant good for hedges and groundcover.

Apple Blossom Yarrow

Apple blossom yarrow is the pink relative of the yellow yarrow often grown in herb gardens. It’s prized not only for its color but its soft, feathery leaves. The combination of pink blooms and silver-green leaves is particularly memorable. Like yellow yarrow, apple blossom dries well and is good for crafts. It’s also edible and can be used for herbal treatments of bleeding, rashes, and skin conditions. If your garden is plagued with deer and rabbits, add this plant – it’s resistant to both.

Hollyhock

Hollyhocks are hot pink flowers resembling the hibiscus. They grow from 3 to 8 feet tall in a vertical formation and need full sun. Hollyhocks are biennials, meaning they don’t bloom until their second year and die that same autumn, so you should take time to establish a standing crop. Once you do, the hollyhocks will reseed each year. Hollyhocks are generally found grown from seed in nurseries. Interestingly, they open from the bottom to the top.

Party Dress Anemone

If you want a flashy flower, the party dress anemone is perfect for you. Hot fuchsia with a bright yellow center, it yields large double blooms during the fall. However, they also bloom in spring and summer to give your garden double shots of color. They’re also deer resistant and grow well in pots and vases. Since they “dance” on their stems, anemones are also called windflowers.

Pumila

Pumila has feathery, almost fur-like pinkish-purple blossoms you might be tempted to stroke. It grows in vertical bunches and is good for smaller gardens. Since it only grows 12 inches tall, pumilia is also great groundcover. This flower does best in shady, moist places and is deer resistant.

Sugar Tip Rose of Sharon

This beautiful light pink flower is a member of the hibiscus family. Its layered pinkish-white blooms give your garden a tranquil and refined air during summer and fall. The sugar tip can grow to eight feet tall, so it works well as a privacy hedge.

 

Photo Credit:

Photographer PublicDomainPictures offered the photograph of Armeria under a Creative Commons License on Pixabay

Photographer robbihoy offered the photograph of Monarda under a Creative Commons License on Pixabay

Photographer PublicDomainPictures offered the photograph of Achillea Millefolium under a Creative Commons License on Pixabay

Photographer Hans Braxmeier offered the photograph of Hollyhock under a Creative Commons License on Pixabay

Photographer HelmaP offered the photograph of Japanese Anemone Flower under a Creative Commons License on Pixabay

Photographer babylass offered the photograph of Pink Rose of Sharon under a Creative Commons License on Pixabay

Photographer Maja Dumat offered the photograph of Bechermalve (Lavatera trimestris) under a Creative Commons License on Pixabay

Photographer Maja Dumat offered the photograph of Bechermalve (Lavatera) under a Creative Commons License on Pixabay

Photographer Brenda Clarke offered the photograph of Flowers under a Creative Commons License on Pixabay